Netherlands, Utrecht (Utrecht City Campus)

Principles of Good Governance

when 7 July 2014 - 18 July 2014
duration 2 weeks
credits 4 ECTS
fee EUR 1260

National legal systems have increasingly become interconnected and have also shown a growing interconnectedness with regional and international legal systems. When solving legal problems, lawmakers, administrations and judges look to other systems for inspiration and guidance. The interconnectedness as a result of the globalization process has also increased concerns about the functioning and positioning of public institutions within a democratic state bound by the rule of law. It is therefore important to become aware of the make-up of other legal systems and of common topics in and problems with the quality of governance, for both academics and practitioners.

Course leader

Prof. Dr. G.H. Addink

Target group

Law, Business Administration students at advanced bachelor or master level.

Course aim

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principle of good governance
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principle of participation
principle of effectiveness
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Principles of Good Governance
Period
07 July 2014 - 18 July 2014 (2 weeks)
Course location(s)
» Utrecht (Utrecht city campus), The Netherlands
Credits
4.0 ECTS credits
Organizing institution
Utrecht University, Faculty of Law, Economics and Governance (UU)
Course fee (incl. housing)
€ 1260
Level
Advanced bachelor level
National legal systems have increasingly become interconnected and have also shown a growing interconnectedness with regional and international legal systems. When solving legal problems, lawmakers, administrations and judges look to other systems for inspiration and guidance. The interconnectedness as a result of the globalization process has also increased concerns about the functioning and positioning of public institutions within a democratic state bound by the rule of law. It is therefore important to become aware of the make-up of other legal systems and of common topics in and problems with the quality of governance, for both academics and practitioners.


The term “Good Governance” is rather new. It originated in the early nineties of the 20th century, when international institutions such as the World Bank and the IMF started to emphasize institutional strengthening within developing countries as a prerequisite for the allocation of resources. In Europe, the term “Good Governance” rapidly gained ground on the regional level. Here different institutions (mainly the EU) used the term as a key element in their answer to the increasing fundamental concerns about their position and functioning. The term has also been used in the case law of the European Court of Justice. The Council of Europe, another institution on the European level which is independent from the EU, is about to publish a Code of Good Governance which aims to provide an overview of and an inspiration for principles of good governance in its Member States.

Within national legal systems, the Principles of ‘Good Governance’ can be related to existing and generally accepted principles as well as to more specific principles in the field of administrative law. It is no surprise that “Good Governance” is a broad term, and its meaning varies depending on the context. It represents a number of things; for example the observance of fundamental (civil, political and social) rights, effectiveness and transparency and accountancy of government (in financial or other matters) and the promotion of the rule of law.

The focus of the course “Principles of Good Governance” will be on the comparative study of the legal aspects of Good Governance as distinguished in different legal systems, on a national, regional (EU) level and international level. The concept and the contents of the Principles of Good Governance will be developed and particular attention will be paid to the interaction between the Principles of Good Governance and the specific fields of administrative law. We will also discover that most of the Principles of Good Governance have developed (partly) new sub-principles.

In the first part of the course (days 1 – 3) the general aspects of Principles of Good Governance will be discussed. In the second part of the course (days 4-8) we will focus on the individual (groups of) Principles of Good Governance.

We start day 1 with the concept of “Principles of Good Governance” and work out the legal approach to this concept. On the second day we will clarify the origins, the developments and the contents of the Principles on the national level. On the third pay we will pay attention to the Principles of Good Governance at the international and European level. On the fourth day the Principle(s) of Proper Administration will be discussed. On the fifth day, we will discuss the Principle(s) of Transparency. On the sixth day we will examine the Principle(s) of Participation. At the seventh day we will focus on the Principle(s) of Effectiveness. During the eighth day of the course we will work on the Principle(s) of Accountability.
More information...
» Download the day-to-day programme (PDF)


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COURSE LEADER
Prof. Dr. G.H. Addink

TARGET GROUP
Law, Business Administration students at advanced bachelor or master level.

COURSE AIM
The purpose of the course is to study the Principles of Good Governance on the national, regional and international level in relation to legal instruments. This covers not only the administration but also the legislature, the judiciary and other institutions of audit and control, and includes enforcement-instruments of the administration and the mechanisms that have been developed to supervise the implementation of these principles.

Fee info

EUR 1260: • € 1260 - Course + course materials + housing
• € 925 - Course + course materials

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on course website