Austria, Vienna

food | Sustainable | design

when 13 February 2017 - 24 February 2017
language English
duration 2 weeks
credits 8 ECTS
fee EUR 800

Food design – eat design Sonja Stummerer and Martin Hablesreiter will perform a summer school about the essential design parameter of food and eating. Therefore both will do several lectures about food design, eat design, taste design and eat art. Students have to do applied food design. They will get a specific task to design and develop an experimental edible object. Stummerer / Hablesreiter do critics and discussions about the creative development every day. One midpresentation and a final presentation will provide wider discussions about food, eating and design. Students have to design experimentally. content food design We shape our environment. When we give form to objects for daily use, we call it design – a notion that was first used in the United Kingdom. Ever since the London-based "British Council of Industrial Design" was founded in 1944, the word "design" has been used to denote the shaping of objects and devices of all descriptions to cater to the needs of mass production. Design meets esthetic, functional and cultural requirements. Hot dogs, cornflakes or chocolate bars are mass-produced articles that are designed with a specific purpose in mind, and thus, as much products of industrial design as cars, ball-point pens or sunglasses. We design food for greater pleasure, and for practical purposes such as longer storage life, but also to convey values and tell myths. In architecture, form, use and style interact, and it is much in the same way that food always combines enjoyment, function and culture. When we drink Coke or put ketchup on our fries, it is not just to whet our appetite, but also to spur our imagination. The question is: what should food be like to be successful? For us the notion ’food design’ refers to the development and shaping of food. In our understanding this includes all the processes and decisions related to successfully designing food in a reproducible and recurring way. This now no longer applies just to the appearance of a dish or a product but also to the design of taste, consistency, texture, surface, the sound of chewing, smell and much more. Artisanship and design constitute an integral part of every culture. The design of food – food design, for short – is a subfield of conventional industrial design and thus a crucial factor of our civilization. Seen in this light, food design means significantly more than just the synthetic manufacturing or the alteration of food on the basis of genetic engineering. To be sure, the use of artificial aromas, the chemical synthesis of hitherto isolated basic substances and the utilization of novel modes of preparation play a role in the design of some foods, but to limit the notion of food design to these processes alone, would, in our view, be misguided. Food design refers to all design of food based on the rules of reproducibility and as such fulfills sensual, functional and cultural demands – much like conventional design. This summer school will try to identify the motivation for designing food. Its structure follows the three main motivations: sensory and sensual pleasure, function and culture. The discussion about the "Design Process" will look at the issue of who decides what our food is like; we will present historical examples as well as contemporary food designers and their working methods. content eat design A fork or a wine glass “ask” to be held or used in a specific way. A chair “demands” that we, quite uncomfortably, sit up straight. The use of a knife usually demonstrates our social and cultural background. Why can the way we use things tell so much about us? How can things define at all how we should eat? And who actually says that these things have to be the way they are and that we must use them exactly the way we use them – and not in a different way? Eat Design presents how utensils impose certain manners, and how our cultural, social and religious backgrounds define how we deal with food and eating utensils. The book reveals how unwritten rules (etiquette, aesthetic norms, dress codes and seating arrangements, dining and property situations, status symbols and a savoir faire with such, etc.) influence our daily, seemingly intimate dietary habits. Eat Design analyses how the invention of the spoon, of fast-food restaurants or porcelain turn the daily act of eating into a designed action, and how with design one can strongly change the lifestyle of whole societies. Is it possible to influence somebody’s dining habits with the design of tableware or cutlery? Yes, it is! Using chopsticks makes you eat slower, thus less, than when eating with spoon and fork. Frozen dinners in plastic dishes rule out traditional fellowship at table. Every eater, any family member can decide individually when, what and where to eat. Restaurant chains reverse social hierarchy by replacing the classical table setting with disposable packaging and eating with ones fingers. “Good” manners, which represent the status, age, and sex of an eater, are suspended. Sonja Stummerer and Martin Hablesreiter analyse traditional dining rituals and their historical backgrounds. Why, of all people, do Europeans and Americans eat with weapons while other cultures prefer to use less martial chopsticks or their fingers in general? Why do we take a seat and sit on it for hours and accept the fact that we have merely 40 by 60 cm to move (the measurements, which according to Neufert’s design doctrine are to be ascribed to an eater)? And why is a specified use (by whom, by the way?) of designed table utensils classified as good behaviour? Countless rules dominate the act of dining and the “good” taste of each particular culture. Their defiance is judged as offence of the domestic, social and cultural order. Sonja Stummerer and Martin Hablesreiter explore rules, taboos, and rituals connected to the act of eating in an intercultural relation. Not only national traditions and religious dietary laws are part of this research but also modern forms of austerity such as vegetarianism, veganism, freeganism, fair trade, etc. The authors analyse the impact of migration movements and urbanisation on the act of eating and question how it is possible that self-proclaimed “guardians of taste” and food critics are able to define and dominate the consumer and eating behaviour of whole nations. In a last step they want to reveal the mechanisms, which exploit dining rules, as well as eating utensils, decoration, taste, disgust, and food design in order to anchor role models, hierarchies, patriarchy and even xenophobia in society. The workshop Eat Design explores the origins of table design objects, of behaviours and of taste. This summer school asks WHAT we eat with WHOM, WHEN, WHERE, HOW, HOW LONG, and WHY?

Course leader

Mag. Arch. Martin Hablesreiter, University Salzburg/ University Fulda /University for Applied Sciences St.Pölten

Target group

designers, artists, creative people, historians, food scientists, nutritional scientists.

Course aim

Food design – eat design Sonja Stummerer and Martin Hablesreiter will perform their 2nd summer school about the essential design parameter of food and eating at the INNES Institute Vienna. Therefore both will do several lectures about food design, eat design, taste design and eat art. Students have to do applied food design. They will get a specific task to design and develop an experimental edible object.
The workshop Eat Design explores the origins of table design objects, of behaviours and of taste. This summer school asks WHAT we eat with WHOM, WHEN, WHERE, HOW, HOW LONG, and WHY?

Credits info

8 ECTS
Participants will receive a certificate of participation at the end of the summer school and all necessary documentation to validate the course at their home university.

Fee info

EUR 800: This is the reduced participation fee for students.

Scholarships

not available