Netherlands, Utrecht (NL)

Holocaust and Genocide in Modern Europe

when 3 August 2015 - 14 August 2015
duration 2 weeks
credits 3 ECTS
fee EUR 1165

During the Second World War, about 6 million Jews were killed by the Nazi’s and their collaborators. Anne Frank, the teenager who was forced to go into hiding in war-time Amsterdam, probably more than anyone else, gave a face to these Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Her diary became one of the canonical texts of the twentieth century, and it is still felt to address the universal drama of persecution and human dignity. This course introduces you not only to the phenomenon of Holocaust but also to other genocides that shocked Modern Europe.

How could the Holocaust happen? And why do genocides occur? Ever since the first pictures of Nazi camps shook the world, scholars have attempted to answer these vital questions. Although the Holocaust is perhaps the most well-known genocide that took place in Modern Europe, unfortunately it has not been the only one. The violence that took place during the early nineties in former Yugoslavia is a sad recent example. During this course you will examine how and why the Holocaust and other genocides in the 20th century have chocked European society. Which political, psychological, and social circumstances led to these crimes against humanity in modern Europe? How can we explain the recurrence of war-related violence in a globalized society? How did European societies deal with the genocidal practices of the twentieth century? Making sense of the Holocaust and genocides involve examining ideas of human nature and communal psychology, racism and nationalism, and the construction of genocides in communal memory. Students will explore the many questions around the holocaust and genocide, and their long-term effects on society. You will also be taken on a number of excursions, for example to the Anne Frank House and the Jewish quarter in Amsterdam, and the International Criminal Court and the Peace Palace in The Hague.

Course leader

Dr. Jaap Verheul

Target group

Students of the humanities and social sciences, including economics and business, political sciences, European studies, international relations, history, culture studies and sociology, the sciences and engineering at senior undergraduate or graduate level with an interest in culture, society and politics.

Course aim

At the end of this course, students should be able to:
• Describe and evaluate different theories and conceptualisations of the historic development of the Holocaust and genocides in Modern Europe
• Discern and analyse key factors in facilitating these phenomena
• Demonstrate an understanding of the political, socio-economic and cultural aspects causing genocides and the long-term effects of Holocaust and genocides on society
• Demonstrate this knowledge and understanding in written and verbal form.
• Demonstrate this detailed and critical knowledge and understanding in written and verbal form.

Credits info

3 ECTS
Certificate of Attendance

Fee info

EUR 1165: Course + course materials + housing
EUR 825: Course + course materials

Scholarships

Utrecht Summer School doesn't offer scholarships for this course.

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