Netherlands, Nijmegen

The Bible and Archaeology

when 1 August 2016 - 5 August 2016
language English
duration 1 week
credits 2 ECTS
fee EUR 490

The Bible is a collection of ancient documents written in Hebrew, Greek and Aramaic. As such, study of them must take into serious consideration the linguistic, social, political and religious context of that period. Modern readers of the Bible often experience disconnection with the ancient world, in that the fascinating, yet unusual language, concepts, titles, customs and practices of the ancients establish an unbridgeable chasm between the reader and interpretation of the text.

This course introduces you to the relationship between archaeological investigations and the study of the Bible. It explores how artefacts and texts can be used in a critical dialogue to reconstruct aspects of the cultural and social milieu of the Bible. We will examine case studies of major discoveries relating to Ancient Israel and Judeo - Christianity.

The purpose of this course is to provide you with an introduction to the relationship between archaeological investigations and the study of the Bible. It explores how artefacts and texts can be used in a critical dialogue to reconstruct aspects of the cultural and social milieu of the Bible. Case studies of major discoveries relating to Ancient Israel and Judeo‐Christianity will be examined.

By the end of this course you will have a better grasp of the major developments in the use of archaeology in relation to the Bible, an understanding of the key principles of archaeology as a source of historical inquiry and the significance and relevance of major excavations for the study of Ancient Israel and Judeo‐Christianity. Copious examples will be provided to encourage you to investigate, decipher, read and translate (with some help) ancient artefacts which illuminate the Ancient Near Eastern and Greco‐Roman world and the implications of these discoveries for biblical interpretation. The lectures will be richly illustrated with ancient coins, papyri, inscriptions and other historical artefacts.

Course leader

Dr. M.P. Theophilos
Senior Lecturer in Bible Studies and Ancient Languages
Faculty of Theology and Philosophy
Australian Catholic University

Target group

Bachelor and Master students with an interest in the relationship between archaeological investigations and the study of the Bible.

Course aim

On successful completion of this course, students are able to:
- Describe the major developments in the use of archaeology in relation to the Bible
- Explain the key principles of archaeology as a source of historical inquiry
- Use a variety of resources, including online resources, to analyse the significance and relevance of major excavations for the study of Ancient Israel and Judeo-Christianity.

Fee info

EUR 490: The course fee includes the registration fee, course materials, access to library and IT facilities, coffee/tea, lunch, and a number of social activities.

Discounts:
10% discount for early bird applicants. The early bird deadline is 1 April 2016.
15% discount for students and PhD candidates from Radboud University and partner universities.
EUR 195: Housing (optional)