United Kingdom, London

British Horror and Fantasy Cinema from Dracula to Harry Potter

when 25 June 2018 - 13 July 2018
language English
duration 3 weeks
credits 7.5 ECTS
fee GBP 1

British cinema is often celebrated for its social realism, yet has made significant and influential contributions to the worlds of horror, fantasy and science fiction. From the Gothic tradition of Dracula to nightmarish visions of London in 28 Days Later and the spectacular popular fantasies of Doctor Who and Harry Potter, this course investigates this alternative history or ‘repressed underside’ of British cinema and the ways in which these films have responded to their social and cultural production contexts.

Introducing you to a range of critical approaches to film and literature and making full use of our unique London setting, we will engage with debates on the cultural appeal and social significance of horror and fantasy, and the nature of audiences and film spectatorship. Key topics for discussion will be the depiction of London and the East End as both a landscape of fear and wonder; the representation of women, gender and sexuality in horror and fantasy; the psychoanalytic interpretation of horror and the ways through which these films engage with the history of Britain and its capital. With an emphasis on cinema, we will also compare the writing of British authors with film adaptations of their work.

Course leader

Dr Matt Jacobsen

Target group

Undergraduate Students

Course aim

This course aims to:

- provide you with knowledge of the development of British horror and fantasy cinema from the 1950s to the present

- provide you with an understanding of the impact of social and economic contexts in Britain in the 20th century and their representation in cinema

- give you an introduction to a wide range of critical approaches in the study of cinema and compare their effectiveness and relevance

- provide a context in which to explore the relationship between history and film production, and an introduction to detailed analysis of films as primary sources within their social, cultural and industrial contexts

- engender an aesthetic understanding and appreciation of British horror and fantasy cinema as well as familiarise you with the indigenous cultural and social significance of dominant visual motifs and narrative themes

- enhance your analytical skills and your ability to write film commentaries and criticism with clarity and authority.

Credits info

7.5 ECTS
7.5 ECTS
You will study one course per QMUL Summer School session. Each course is worth 15 QMUL credits.

Usually, the 15 credits we award for each three-week QMUL Summer School session translate to 3–4 credits in the US system and 7.5 ECTS in the European system.

Your home institution should confirm if they will grant credit for Summer School courses. Whilst we will do everything we can to support you throughout the Summer School application process, it's your responsibility to check with your home institution if you can transfer credit from the Summer School prior to arriving at QMUL.

Fee info

GBP 1: The QMUL Summer School costs: £1,499 per session, which includes tution and social programme.

We are offering a 10% early bird discount for those who apply before 28 February 2018.

From 28 February onwards we will offer a 10% discount to

Students and staff from partner institutions
Alumni
Current QMUL students

Accommodation
On campus accommodation (bed and breakfast) will cost £899 per session.

Additional costs and course excursions
Please note that some courses have some additional fees not included in the Tuition and Social Programme Fee. These fees are for activities and field trips that may take place away from our campus. We will give further details of these costs in due course.

Please note there is no deposit payment required for the QMUL Summer School.

Scholarships

There are no scholarships available for this course

Register for this course
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